Apart from I think 99% of the preppers are simply mentally ill (yeah having 150 firearms, forcing your children to walk 24 kilometers, livingApart from I think 99% of the preppers are simply mentally ill (yeah having 150 firearms, forcing your children to walk 24 kilometers, living in a bunker every summer for months!!!, forcing you son to take bath in the garden during winter, to wash down the imaginary bacterias from his body....is NUTS), the show is quiet decent.I do not like (unethical) how NatGeo reviews the preparedness level of these people. I think preparing for something that has 0.0000000000000001% chance to happen is just stupid (Super volcano eruptions, ?zombies?? Seriously?). You can not live your life in fear. Most of these people have other problems and preparing is just a projection of these problems. It is also sad that Americans prepare to kill their own people with no remorse. Basically they are preparing to fight against their own nation...… Expand
The Sundome opens to a full 7 x 5 feet and will comfortably fit 2 adults. It’s light, has a polyethylene base that keeps ground moisture out and a 75 denier fly to protect you from rain and snow. The Sundome is survival gear that goes up in a hurry for those times when there’s no time to waste. It can easily be assembled by one person even when the wind has kicked up. That’s because it utilizes only 2 instead of the normal 3 or 4 tent poles. You’ll never be victimized by the elements as long as you’re toting the portable and affordable Coleman Sundome with you.
The survivalist hard-on (yep, and I'll do it again, too) for prophylactics untouched by chemical pleasure-enhancers is the result of drilling deep (told you) into the magical properties of our latex friends. According to our research, these flexible, durable, waterproof wonders will be as much of a deciding factor in your dystopian longevity as fire and can openers.
Typically, survival kits are designed to help you get through a situation in which help cannot be secured. However, if you equip yourself with a satellite phone you can contact help from anywhere on the planet. In other situations, a pre-paid cell phone or two-way radio (be sure to find out the frequency the local ranger station or emergency responders use) may be all that you need to contact help when you need it most.
Cell Phones: While cell phones are still not 100 percent reliable in the backcountry, service coverage and the usefulness of smartphones has increased dramatically in the last seven years. While cell phones are still questionably reliable in the backcountry, many adventurers will carry them anyway as they also serve as light cameras and can help with GPS and electronic compass navigation. Today, most of them also work as a flashlight. Regardless, they are worthless if the battery is dead, so plan accordingly.
Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case.
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